Cookies are small information items (text files) stored in users’ PCs and used widely by online service providers for several purposes, such as to capture user preferences (language, background colors , etc.),


1::They could contain a virus which then infects my computer.
1::The collection of data stored in my device
3::The collection of personal data as well as the risk that someone could impersonate me

This is not correct: cookies are not a form of malware and do not raise this specific type of security problem (i.e. computer virus), since they are simply text files. However cookies could raise the following security and privacy concerns:

  • Collection of information on user preferences / behaviour (e.g. visited sites). Therefore, profiling of the user is possible.

  • Collection of private information via session hijacking

  • Impersonation of users leading to malicious logon into their accounts (e.g. banking, e-mail, etc.).

  • Modification of useful information (e.g. search results).

Therefore, the correct answer is the collection of personal data as well as the risk that someone could impersonate me.

For more information, see here:

https://www.enisa.europa.eu/publications/copy_of_cookies

 

This is not correct. Cookies could raise the following security and privacy concerns:

  • Collection of information on user preferences / behaviour (e.g. visited sites). Therefore, profiling of the user is possible.

  • Collection of private information via session hijacking

  • Impersonation of users leading to malicious logon into their accounts (e.g. banking, e-mail, etc.).

  • Modification of useful information (e.g. search results).

Therefore, the correct answer is the collection of personal data as well as the risk that someone could impersonate me.

For more information, see here:

https://www.enisa.europa.eu/publications/copy_of_cookies

 

This is correct. More precisely, cookies could raise the following security and privacy concerns:

  • Collection of information on user preferences / behaviour (e.g. visited sites). Therefore, profiling of the user is possible.

  • Collection of private information via session hijacking

  • Impersonation of users leading to malicious logon into their accounts (e.g. banking, e-mail, etc.).

  • Modification of useful information (e.g. search results).

For more information, see here:

https://www.enisa.europa.eu/publications/copy_of_cookies

 


to identify the user when he/she uses a shopping list etc. By these means, cookies have indeed positive functions (e.g. they help avoiding the need to repeatedly have to identify yourself). 

However cookies also raise some security and privacy concerns, for example…