Internet users are increasingly being tracked and profiled: this is the practice of tailoring online content, especially advertisements, to visitors based on their inferred interests, or ‘profile’.


1::Private browsing.
2::Opt-out option.
3::‘Do not track’ option.

This is incorrect, unfortunately. Private browsing allows you to navigate the Internet and visit web pages and services without saving in your device information about the sites you have visited. Therefore, private browsing, offers you privacy only from people with physical access to your computer.

The correct answer is the do not track option, which is a combination of technical and policy aspects. The do not track option is a feature provided by all major commercial web browsers which allows you to inform websites that you do not want them to track your browsing behavior. While the do not track option offers a way of being tracked less in some instances, there is no real solution at the moment since individual websites may not respect it. Some further tools to consider are Ghostery

https://www.ghostery.com

and JavaScript Blocker

http://javascript-blocker.toggleable.com/ .

 

See for more information the ENISA report Privacy considerations of online behavioural tracking :

https://www.enisa.europa.eu/activities/identity-and-trust/library/deliverables/privacy-considerations-of-online-behavioural-tracking

as well as the following:

http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/browser-fingerprinting-and-the-onlinetracking-arms-race#

 

This is partially correct. Some services allow you to opt-out of certain forms of tracking and profiling. For instance some web pages offer you the opportunity to opt-out of receiving targeted advertising, i.e. to state that you do not want to receive such advertising in the future. The correct answer is the do not track option which is a combination of technical and policy aspects. The do not track option is a feature provided by all major commercial web browsers which allows you to inform websites that you do not want them to track your browsing behavior. While the do not track option offers a way of being tracked less in some instances, there is no real solution at the moment since individual websites may not respect it. Some further tools to consider are Ghostery

https://www.ghostery.com

and JavaScript Blocker

http://javascript-blocker.toggleable.com/.

 

See for more information the ENISA report Privacy considerations of online behavioural tracking :

https://www.enisa.europa.eu/activities/identity-and-trust/library/deliverables/privacy-considerations-of-online-behavioural-tracking

as well as the following:

http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/browser-fingerprinting-and-the-onlinetracking-arms-race#

 

This is the correct answer. All major commercial web browsers offer a do not track option, which is a combination of technical and policy aspects. The do not track option allows you to inform websites that you do not want them to track your browsing behavior. While the do not track option offers a way of being tracked less in some instances, there is no real solution at the moment since individual websites may not respect it. Some further tools to consider are Ghostery

https://www.ghostery.com

and JavaScript Blocker.

http://javascript-blocker.toggleable.com/

 

See for more information the ENISA report Privacy considerations of online behavioural tracking :

https://www.enisa.europa.eu/activities/identity-and-trust/library/deliverables/privacy-considerations-of-online-behavioural-tracking

as well as the following:

http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/browser-fingerprinting-and-the-onlinetracking-arms-race#

 


For example, a like button (such as the one employed by Facebook) tracks users across sites; each time a user visits a site that contains a Facebook ‘Like’ button, the social networking site is informed about it even if the user does not click on this button.

 

You can activate an option that limits this profiling in your web browser. This is called…