These days, authorities often insist that users should be informed that any information concerning them that has been on the Internet never disappears and that this information might eventually be used for other (probably undesired) purposes.


2::The right to access.
1::The right to freedom of speech.
3::The right to erasure.

This is not correct, although it can be considered as partially correct since this right has also to do with personal data protection. The right to access means that you may obtain from the corresponding authority confirmation as to whether or not personal data concerning you are being processed and, where that is the case, more detailed information (which type of data, the purposes etc.). The correct answer is the right to erasure (or ‘right to be forgotten’), and it means that you have the right to obtain from an authority the erasure of personal data concerning you without undue delay. This is about empowering individuals, not about erasing past events or restricting freedom of the press. This right is addressed in the General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679 (the Regulation entered into force on 24 May 2016, and shall apply from 25 May 2018) and broadens the right to object that is addressed in the 95/46/EC Directive on Protection of Personal Data. The Regulation is available here: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/data-protection/reform/files/regulation_oj_en.pdf

 

This is not correct. While the right to freedom of speech is important, the specific right that is implied in this scenario is the right to erasure (or ‘right to be forgotten’), which means that you have the right to obtain from an authority the erasure of personal data concerning you without undue delay. This is about empowering individuals, not about erasing past events or restricting freedom of the press. This right is addressed in the General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679 (the Regulation entered into force on 24 May 2016, and shall apply from 25 May 2018) and broadens the right to object that is addressed in the 95/46/EC Directive on Protection of Personal Data. The Regulation is available here: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/data-protection/reform/files/regulation_oj_en.pdf

 

This is the correct answer. The right to erasure (or ‘right to be forgotten’) means that you have the right to obtain from an authority the erasure of personal data concerning you without undue delay. This is about empowering individuals, not about erasing past events or restricting freedom of the press. This right is addressed in the General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679 (the Regulation entered into force on 24 May 2016, and shall apply from 25 May 2018) and broadens the right to object that is addressed in the 95/46/EC Directive on Protection of Personal Data. The Regulation is available here: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/data-protection/reform/files/regulation_oj_en.pdf

 


The right for protecting the users from these scenarios is called...