Internet users are increasingly being tracked and profiled; this is the practice of tailoring online content, especially advertisements, to visitors based on their inferred interests.


1::Your digital identity could be stolen.
3::Risks for privacy and exclusion from services.
2::Mass surveillance.

Unfortunately this is not the correct answer. User profiling in this scenario is not related to the risk of identity theft (the latter one means that someone else can impersonate yourself via obtaining some of your personal information).

Rather, the way you use the web can be used by a third party to construct a detailed profile about you (e.g. to gain knowledge on your interests), which not only endangers your privacy, but may also lead to adverse consequences such as exclusion from services.

 

This is the correct answer. Indeed, the way you use the web can be used by a third party to construct a detailed profile about you (e.g. to gain knowledge on your interests), which not only endangers your privacy, but may also lead to adverse consequences such as exclusion from services.

 

This is partially correct. Indeed, mass surveillance could be connected to user profiling; however, mass surveillance is a more general term than single profiling. This surveillance can be performed by governments for security or political reasons or by companies for commercial reasons.

The probable key risk however is that the way you use the web can be used by a third party to construct a detailed profile about yourself (e.g. to gain knowledge on your interests), which not only endangers your privacy, but may also lead to adverse consequences such as exclusion from services.


For example, a like button (such as the one used by Facebook) tracks users across sites; each time a user visits a site that contains a Facebook ‘Like’ button, the social networking site is informed about it even if the user does not click on this button.

This profiling practice carries some risks for the users among which a relevant one is…..